"To be beautiful means to be yourself. You don’t need to be accepted by others. You need to accept yourself."

— Thich Nhat Hanh

destroycomics:

David Rubin is the artist hand-selected by Paul Pope to take the reigns of the art to the Battling Boy prequel to add a world to JT Petty and Paul Pope’s words. David Rubin’s art both compliments and rivals Paul Pope as the universe of Battling Boy expands into a completely different direction. I’m pleased to welcome David Rubin as the subject of the first interview on Destroy Comics. 

Title Illustration by David Zissou

David Zissou: Who is David Rubin, the cartoonist?

David Rubin: I’m a cartoonist and illustrator born in Galicia, a region in the north of Spain.

I started my career publishing in several fanzines in Galicia, and then I started to publish in some comic magazines in Spain.

A few years ago, I published my early graphic novels “El Circo del desaliento”(Astiberri, 2005), “La tetería del oso malayo” (Astiberri, 2006) and “Cuaderno de Tormentas” (Planeta DeAgostini, 2008) and my work began to be published in other countries like France, Italy or Czech Republic.

At the same time that I did those books, I was working on some film animation productions, as director and art director.

In January of 2010, I left my work in the cinema and began working full time as a cartoonist.

Since then, I’ve made other books like “The Hero vol.01 and 02”; a graphic novel over 600 pages long about my personal vision of the myth of Heracles.  It’s going to be published in the USA by Dark Horse next year.

(Pre-order The Hero)

And I also drew “Beowulf,” a savage and visceral version of the traditional English poem, in collaboration with the writer Santiago García.  “Beowulf” will be published in English too, by Image Comics.

And then comes Aurora and…well….

Zissou: Who are your influences and how did they affect the direction you took with The Rise of Aurora West?

Rubin: I think that Jack Kirby and Frank Miller’s work are the most powerful influences in my work – and my favorite artists, too — but there are a lot of authors that have made their mark in my style, artist like Blutch, JC Forest, Peellaert, Guy Davis, Kazuo Koike, José Muñoz, John Romita Sr. & Jr., Alex Toth, David Mazzucchelli , Javier Olivares, Santiago Sequeiros, Osamu Tezuka, Go Nagai, Mizuki and, of course, Paul Pope.

(Blutch, Total Jazz.)

But I don’t only partake of comics influences.  It’s important for me always consider other disciplines, disciplines like cinema, animation, short videos, music, literature, poetry or painting.

I’ve tried to combine everything in a “mix-tape style,” and the final result is my own style.  It reminds me of a lot of things, but is something new at the same time.

This is the way I made The Rise of Aurora West and all my other books.

Zissou: What  are “superhero comics” to you?

Rubin: My favorite superhero comic is “Daredevil: Born Again” by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli. Well, it’s my favorite comic in all the world.

(A juxtaposed page of roof top running from Born Again and The Rise of Aurora West)

And I like old stuff like the Spiderman issues by John Romita Sr., Gil Kane, or Ross Andru, “Adam Strange” by Gardner Fox, Mike Sekowsky, and Carmine Infantino, and all the Kirby stuff – especially New Gods and Kamandi.

I really love the work of David Aja in “Hawkeye,” Javier Pulido on “The Hulk,” “FF” by Fraction and Allred, and everything that Marcos Martín makes.

(A page from Mike Allred’s FF and David Rubin’s designs for Medula’s Gang in Aurora West; parallels can be shown in how Allred and Rubin texture their monsters.)

And “Lone Wolf & Cub,” by Koike and Kojima. Well…it isn’t a superhero comic, but after “Born Again,” it’s my favorite comic of them all.

(A panel from Lone Wolf & Cub; the dynamic of a child and a single parent in a vicious world uncannily carries over into Rubin’s work on Aurora West. Daigorō is still dependent on his father as a baby, Haggard West won’t give Aurora her Jetpack.) 

Zissou: A trend I noticed starting last year that I hope continues is the movement of well-respected cartoonists from high-profile books at Marvel and DC to projects at First Second that afford them the creative freedom in reaching an even wider audience. Specifically, I’ve seen this with Farel Dalrymple following Omega the Unknown with The Wrenchies, and Paul Pope taking Battling Boy to First Second after Batman Year 100. Having read The Rise of Aurora West with that in mind, the book feels like something between Batman Year 100 and Battling Boy in terms of your own unique brand of cartooning introduced to an American audience. What was it like collaborating on Aurora West with Paul Pope and JT Petty while maintaining authorship over the characters as well as working for an American publisher? 

Rubin: Working for First Second is not the same as working for Marvel or DC.

The characters and the world where the story happens are both creations of Paul’s, not mine. But I have a lot of freedom to move in that world.

It’s a world full of concepts that I love, that I feel comfortable working on.  I don’t feel like I’m only working for hire with Aurora West, I feel that this book is mine, too.

And dealing with First Second, Paul, JT, and everyone who’s involved in the creation of those books is fantastic — it’s very much like my dealings with the Spanish and European publishers that I’ve worked with before.

Zissou: As a Spanish cartoonist working on a series developed by an American cartoonist about something as culturally diverse as monsters, how did your personal history with monster stories, as well as drawing your own with Beowulf and other comics, direct how you designed your cast of monsters?

Rubin: I’ve liked monsters since I was a child. And in my country, Galicia, we have a huge ancient tradition of monsters, ghouls, and other weird creatures like wolfmen or phantoms – a lot like what happens in Scotland or in Japan with the yokai and traditional historical folktales.

My country is very different from the rest of Spain.  We don’t have “Toreros” or “Sevillanas” and it rains a whole lot, but we have so many stories about monsters and phantoms instead.  That works better for me!

I think that this is the origin of my fascination with monsters and other creatures of the night — and because I like to draw them so much.

Zissou: One of the definitive differences between the Aurora West book and Paul’s Battling Boy is the detective atmosphere that develops around the themes in Aurora’s past in her attempts to better understand her future where Battling Boy thrives on a privileged god-kid who doesn’t know what he’s doing. In drawing Aurora West, what do you think makes her character stand out compared to Battling Boy and other superheroes at other publishers?

Rubin: Appreciation of the detective atmosphere – that’s great!

I’m trying to make Aurora and Haggard’s adventures feel like Batman and Robin 60’s and 70’s adventures.  Well…in confidence, I can tell you that I consider Aurora West books to be the best “Batman & Robin without Batman & Robin” story of the last few years.

And on the subject of the comparison between Aurora and Battling Boy; there are some similarities between Battling Boy and Aurora; both are learning to be heroes, both have a lot of doubts about themselves and their own different fates, and both are still kids.  

But Battling Boy came from another realm full of gods and heroes, a world where everything is possible.  He had a easy life until he came to Arcopolis, while Aurora grew up in a world with only one hero; her own father, in a city under siege, full of monsters and menace.

And that has made a big difference in the personalities of them both. 

The Rise of Aurora West by Paul Pope, JT Petty, and the David Rubin is out now! There’s still time to participate in the Rise of Aurora West Fanart Contest too!

#DavidRubin

"Don’t share work-in-progress with non-writers. Indeed, don’t even discuss it. Think of work-in-progress as an egg around which the shell has not yet hardened. I told my wonderful husband, a newspaper editor, my idea for a scene I wanted to write. ‘It sounds like a cliché to me,’ he said. I winced—but as an editor on a daily deadline, his job is to derail weak ideas before they waste anyone’s time. As a fiction writer, mine is to trust my ideas, follow them around dark corners and see what turns up. Thankfully, I wrote my scene. The story won a prize that took me to Russia, ran in a top literary magazine, and was published in my first book."

— Dylan Landis (via mttbll)

I think this applies to #art as well.

(Source: writersdigest.com, via characterandwritinghelp)

mimswriter:

Stephen King: 10 More Quotes on Writing
01. “By the time I was fourteen the nail in my wall would no longer support the weight of the rejection slips impaled upon it. I replaced the nail with a spike and went on writing.”  
02. “Reading is the creative center of a writer’s life.” 
03. “You can, you should, and if you’re brave enough to start, you will.”  
04. “For me writing has always been best when it’s intimate, as sexy as skin on skin.” 
05. “Sometimes you have to go on when you don’t feel like it, and sometimes you’re doing good work when it feels like all you’re managing is to shovel shit from a sitting position.”
06. “Life isn’t a support system for art. It’s the other way around.”  
07. “Optimism is a perfectly legitimate response to failure.”  
08. “I’m convinced that fear is at the root of most bad writing.”  
09. “What you need to remember is that there’s a difference between lecturing about what you know and using it to enrich the story. The latter is good. The former is not.”  
10. “Language does not always have to wear a tie and lace-up shoes. The object of fiction isn’t grammatical correctness but to make the reader welcome and then tell a story… to make him/her forget, whenever possible, that he/she is reading a story at all.” 

mimswriter:

Stephen King: 10 More Quotes on Writing

01. “By the time I was fourteen the nail in my wall would no longer support the weight of the rejection slips impaled upon it. I replaced the nail with a spike and went on writing.”  

02. “Reading is the creative center of a writer’s life.” 

03. “You can, you should, and if you’re brave enough to start, you will.”  

04. “For me writing has always been best when it’s intimate, as sexy as skin on skin.” 

05. “Sometimes you have to go on when you don’t feel like it, and sometimes you’re doing good work when it feels like all you’re managing is to shovel shit from a sitting position.”

06. “Life isn’t a support system for art. It’s the other way around.”  

07. “Optimism is a perfectly legitimate response to failure.”  

08. “I’m convinced that fear is at the root of most bad writing.”  

09. “What you need to remember is that there’s a difference between lecturing about what you know and using it to enrich the story. The latter is good. The former is not.”  

10. “Language does not always have to wear a tie and lace-up shoes. The object of fiction isn’t grammatical correctness but to make the reader welcome and then tell a story… to make him/her forget, whenever possible, that he/she is reading a story at all.” 

(via characterandwritinghelp)

alostsketchbook:

Graffiti

alostsketchbook:

Graffiti

helpfulharrie:

Okay so! When you’re in school you’re often taught that the colour wheel looks like this:

image

However when you actually try mixing a colour wheel using RBY you actually get something that looks kinda like this right

image

Sometimes your purple will just look straight up…

Is this true for paints?

Anonymous said: Do you have any information on accurately portraying a modern-day psychiatric hospital environment? Are nurses able to adjust a patient's medication as needed, or is that something only a doctor can do? Also, what would actually happen if a patient had an outburst in a hospital setting? (I'd like to think that hospital staff would just pull the patient to the side so that they can talk through it and calm down instead of the drugs and restraints you see so much on tv/movies) Thanks in advance!

characterandwritinghelp:

Tumblbud, you have come to the right place. I went to a psychiatric hospital in the summer of 2010.

[Content warning: This extremely long post is basically a breakdown of what I went through as a patient in an adult psychiatric institution. It is therefore limited to what I experienced firsthand and is further limited by my memory. I am going to be discussing depression, suicide, self-harm, medication, and the hospital environments in the medical hospital and in the psychiatric hospital I went to (interspersed with cute pictures of my dog to lighten the mood). This is rough stuff, if any of this may be triggering to you, please do not click. -Headless]

Read More

A gripping essay about being committed to a psych ward.

"You think your pain and your heartbreak are unprecedented in the history of the world, but then you read. It was books that taught me that the things that tormented me most were the very things that connected me with all the people who were alive, or who had ever been alive."

— James Baldwin (via victoriousvocabulary)

#pain #quote

(via headlesswriter)

deimos-remus:

100 Illustrators that all Illustrators should know: #31

Virgil Finlay (1914-1971)

Country: United States

Famous for: Pulp Art, Horror Stories, Sci-Fi Stories, Lovecraft stories

Influenced: Jean “Moebius Giraud, Pulp Art, Comic Art, Richard Corben, Bernie Wrightson, John Schoenherr

Influenced by: Joseph Clement-Coll, Maxfield Parrish, Franklin Booth, Gustave Doré, Henry Fuselli

Virgil Finlay was a prominent American pulp artist, famous for his work that appeared in the sci-fi and horror pulp magazine, Weird Tales. Among the stories he illustrated were by such authors as Ray Bradbury, H.P. Lovecraft, H.G. Wells, Arthur C. Clarke, Edgar Rice Burroughs, and more. He is well-known for his use of line, as well as stippling, done in the vein of engravers like Gustave Doré. Among his awards are the Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist, Best Interior Illustrator, as well as being inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2012. 

deimos-remus:

100 Illustrators that all Illustrators should know: #33

Chalres M. Schulz (1922-2000)

Country: United States

Famous for: Peanuts

Influenced: Cartoons, Newspaper cartoonists, Gilbert Hernandez, Gary Trudeau, Stephan Pastis, animation

Influenced by: George Herriman, Roy Crane, Percy Crosby, Pablo Picasso

Charles Schulz was an american cartoonist and illustrator, best known for creating the world-famous Peanuts series. Peanuts ran from 1950 until Schulz’ death in 2000, of which he himself drew them all; all 15,000+ strips. Because of the multimedia franchise Peanuts had become, Schulz is also one of the most, if not the most commercially successful illustrator ever, having a net-worth of over 1 billion. Peanuts was noted for its enduring, charming child characters, but for their often heady, sarcastic, and at times existentialist dialogue as well. With how long Peanuts ran, Schulz is one of the most influential cartoonists to ever live, and is among the most important figures in comic history. 

In middle school, I got a fountain pen so I could imitate #Schulz’s line.

randomlancila:

Stereotyping does not occur in a vacuum. It’s the first step on a really dark path. Words mean things. Assumptions mean things. Be aware of this.

This includes folks with #religion or #politics you disagee with. #Love everybody, no exceptions.

(via characterandwritinghelp)

comradewallpapers:

The Wrenchies

High Res

https://www.mediafire.com/folder/3cyrx1d4t0daf/The_Wrenchies

I love #FarelDalrymple’s #art work.

(via popgunwar)

"We’ve all selected the wrong partners, all gotten hurt, and hopefully all moved on wiser for the experience. But there are those who, even in the face of constant disappointment, continue to believe that the intensity of their desire will be rewarded by an eventual jackpot of affection. And if that’s the slot machine you’re playing, friend, you’d better leave the casino ‘cause that one don’t pay out"

— Paul Dini

#quote Work by Danger Dust in chalk

#quote Work by Danger Dust in chalk

Tags: quotes

thewritingcafe:

WHAT IS NANOWRIMO?
NaNoWriMo stands for National Novel Writing Month. It begins on November 1st of every year and goes until 11:59 on November 30th. During this time, participants must write a novel that is at least 50,000 words.
If you win NaNoWriMo, you get some perks that are listed on the website each year. Examples include discounts on writing software, free downloads, and some free physical copies of your self published book.
There is also a related event called Camp NaNoWriMo. This is the same as NaNoWriMo, but with a few differences:
Camp NaNoWriMo takes place in April and July.
On the Camp NaNoWriMo website, you can be in “cabins" with other writers where you can chat and encourage each other to write.
You can set your own word count goal for Camp NaNoWriMo.
FAQ ABOUT NANOWRIMO
Do I have to write a novel? Can I write an anthology of short stories?

While the original premise was to write a novel, you are free to write an anthology or short stories (or something similar) if you wish.

Does it have to be original fiction? Can I write fan fiction?

Again, the original premise was to write original fiction, but you can write fan fiction if you want.

Am I allowed to plan my story before November?

Yes! Writers are encouraged to prepare prior to NaNoWriMo.

Am I allowed to start writing my story before NaNoWriMo as long as I write an additional 50k words during November?

You’re supposed to start with a new story, but there’s no one to stop you from continuing an old story or even rewriting one.

Does my novel have to be 50,000 words, or can I go over?

You can definitely go over the word count.

Make sure to check the nanowrimo website for more FAQs.
PLANNING AND PREPARATION 
If you’re prone to writer’s block, I highly recommend that you plan before you write:
My Outlining and Planning Guide
Name Generators for People, Places, and Things 
Naming Characters 
Titles 
World Building 
Prepping For NaNoWriMo: The Outlining Stage
Otherwise, prepare mentally and physically for the challenge of writing a novel in a month. Plan out when you will write each day and for how long. Remember, you need at least 1667 words per day to reach the goal by the end of the month. Find a nice spot to write, have all your notes in order, and back up all your files. Here are some more tips and resources:
My Preparation Advice
Kris Noel’s Preparation Advice
Create Your Own Writer’s Retreat
Book Geek Confessions’ Prep Advice
WRITING
One thing you need to avoid during NaNoWriMo is editing. If you edit while you’re trying to write, your writing will be slowed and you’ll fall behind. Just keep writing.
Getting Started
Motivation 
Writing the Beginning 
Writing the Middle 
Writing the End
The Elephant Technique (for when you’re stuck with naming or describing something)
Finishing Your Story
Inspiration
Writing Playlists and Music
Writer’s Block
Writing Software and Websites
OTHER NANOWRIMO TIPS
10 NaNoWriMo Tips
20 Things You Should Know About NaNo
NaNo Tips
NaNoWriMo is Coming
Writer’s Digest NaNoWriMo Tips
Checklist for Nano
Lots of NaNo Tips
Word Count Widgets If You Don’t Like the NaNo Ones
AFTER NANO ENDS
So NaNoWriMo is over (or you’ve finished your novel) and now you have a rough draft of your manuscript. Here are some tips:
Do not immediately send it to an agent or publisher. Tons of people start sending out their manuscripts right after NaNoWriMo and it’s a huge mistake because they’re not sending polished, ready-to-be-published manuscripts. They’re sending rough drafts they wrote quickly.
Leave it alone before you start editing. Walk away from your manuscript and work on something else or take a break from writing. This break could be a few days, a few weeks, or even a few months. It depends on you. Then start editing once you’re fresh again.
For more on editing and publishing, see my How to Write and Publish a Novel page.

November is National Novel Writing Month. 50K words in 31 days. Get to it. #NaNoWriMo

thewritingcafe:

WHAT IS NANOWRIMO?

NaNoWriMo stands for National Novel Writing Month. It begins on November 1st of every year and goes until 11:59 on November 30th. During this time, participants must write a novel that is at least 50,000 words.

If you win NaNoWriMo, you get some perks that are listed on the website each year. Examples include discounts on writing software, free downloads, and some free physical copies of your self published book.

There is also a related event called Camp NaNoWriMo. This is the same as NaNoWriMo, but with a few differences:

  • Camp NaNoWriMo takes place in April and July.
  • On the Camp NaNoWriMo website, you can be in “cabins" with other writers where you can chat and encourage each other to write.
  • You can set your own word count goal for Camp NaNoWriMo.

FAQ ABOUT NANOWRIMO

Do I have to write a novel? Can I write an anthology of short stories?

While the original premise was to write a novel, you are free to write an anthology or short stories (or something similar) if you wish.

Does it have to be original fiction? Can I write fan fiction?

Again, the original premise was to write original fiction, but you can write fan fiction if you want.

Am I allowed to plan my story before November?

Yes! Writers are encouraged to prepare prior to NaNoWriMo.

Am I allowed to start writing my story before NaNoWriMo as long as I write an additional 50k words during November?

You’re supposed to start with a new story, but there’s no one to stop you from continuing an old story or even rewriting one.

Does my novel have to be 50,000 words, or can I go over?

You can definitely go over the word count.

Make sure to check the nanowrimo website for more FAQs.

PLANNING AND PREPARATION 

If you’re prone to writer’s block, I highly recommend that you plan before you write:

Otherwise, prepare mentally and physically for the challenge of writing a novel in a month. Plan out when you will write each day and for how long. Remember, you need at least 1667 words per day to reach the goal by the end of the month. Find a nice spot to write, have all your notes in order, and back up all your files. Here are some more tips and resources:

WRITING

One thing you need to avoid during NaNoWriMo is editing. If you edit while you’re trying to write, your writing will be slowed and you’ll fall behind. Just keep writing.

OTHER NANOWRIMO TIPS

AFTER NANO ENDS

So NaNoWriMo is over (or you’ve finished your novel) and now you have a rough draft of your manuscript. Here are some tips:

  • Do not immediately send it to an agent or publisher. Tons of people start sending out their manuscripts right after NaNoWriMo and it’s a huge mistake because they’re not sending polished, ready-to-be-published manuscripts. They’re sending rough drafts they wrote quickly.
  • Leave it alone before you start editing. Walk away from your manuscript and work on something else or take a break from writing. This break could be a few days, a few weeks, or even a few months. It depends on you. Then start editing once you’re fresh again.

For more on editing and publishing, see my How to Write and Publish a Novel page.

November is National Novel Writing Month. 50K words in 31 days. Get to it. #NaNoWriMo