"People say that what we’re all seeking is a meaning for life. I don’t think that’s what we’re really seeking. I think that what we’re seeking is an experience of being alive, so that our life experiences on the purely physical plane will have resonances with our own innermost being and reality, so that we actually feel the rapture of being alive."

Joseph Campbell (via theonlymagicleftisart)

#quote

(via theonlymagicleftisart)

superdames:

Phantom Lady, taking care of business.
—Phantom Lady #14 (1947) by Ruth Roche & Matt Baker

superdames:

Phantom Lady, taking care of business.

—Phantom Lady #14 (1947) by Ruth Roche & Matt Baker


"Impostor syndrome is the frequent feeling of not deserving one’s success, and of being of a failure despite a sustained record of achievements. Highly successful people often experience it throughout their careers, especially when they are members of a group that is underrepresented in their profession—such as female scientists or engineers. In every job I’ve had in the last 25 years, I’ve been the first woman to hold my position—head of computer science and dean of science at the University of British Columbia, dean of engineering at Princeton, and now president of Harvey Mudd College. As my career progressed, so did the intensity of my feelings of failure.
"Now I wake up most days with a voice on the left side of my head telling me what an incredible failure I am. But the voice on the right side tells me that I can change the world—and I try to pay more attention to it. My life goal in changing the world is to make the culture of science and engineering supportive of everyone with interest, ability, and willingness to work hard, independent of race, gender, sexual orientation, other interests, or anything else. For that to happen, we need more women, people of color, poets, artists, ballroom dancers, and football players to enter, succeed, and persist in all areas of science and engineering."
— Maria Klawe, Ph.D. (x)


#women in #science

"Impostor syndrome is the frequent feeling of not deserving one’s success, and of being of a failure despite a sustained record of achievements. Highly successful people often experience it throughout their careers, especially when they are members of a group that is underrepresented in their profession—such as female scientists or engineers. In every job I’ve had in the last 25 years, I’ve been the first woman to hold my position—head of computer science and dean of science at the University of British Columbia, dean of engineering at Princeton, and now president of Harvey Mudd College. As my career progressed, so did the intensity of my feelings of failure.

"Now I wake up most days with a voice on the left side of my head telling me what an incredible failure I am. But the voice on the right side tells me that I can change the world—and I try to pay more attention to it. My life goal in changing the world is to make the culture of science and engineering supportive of everyone with interest, ability, and willingness to work hard, independent of race, gender, sexual orientation, other interests, or anything else. For that to happen, we need more women, people of color, poets, artists, ballroom dancers, and football players to enter, succeed, and persist in all areas of science and engineering."

Maria Klawe, Ph.D. (x)

#women in #science

(via hardcoregurlz)

archiemcphee:

There’s something awesome about a thing that’s so cute, it transcends cuteness to become nightmarishly creepy. That’s precisely the case with these impressively freaky pears, photographed last year at a supermarket in Beijing, China.

The pears are shaped like this by placing them inside special molds when they’re still very small. As they grow they fill the mold and take on its shape. They were marketed at the grocery store as “happy/joyful doll pears,” but we think they look like they’re patiently waiting for you to try taking a bite out of them, at which point they’ll start screaming bloody murder, or worse, turn you into a creepy pear-doll-person too.

[via Neatorama and RocketNews24]

This is much worse than chocolate bunnies.

New #drawing

New #drawing

Tags: drawing

#Portrait with no face.

#Portrait with no face.

Tags: portrait

expecttheunexpectedtoday:

expecttheunexpectedtoday

"The Ghost of Sitting Bull" / old scrap metal farm machinery
by South Dakotan sculptor and metalwork master John Lopez

expecttheunexpectedtoday:

expecttheunexpectedtoday

"The Ghost of Sitting Bull" / old scrap metal farm machinery
by South Dakotan sculptor and metalwork master John Lopez

(Source: stunningpicture, via hifructosemag)

septagonstudios:

Stavros Damos

septagonstudios:

Stavros Damos

#selfie from a gesture #drawing.

#selfie from a gesture #drawing.

Tags: selfie drawing

Almost human.

Almost human.

(Source: qoafosho, via fuckyeahdementia)

superdames:

I heard you couldn’t go to San Diego. I’m sad too. Here’s something to do instead.
We’re making a comic starring Jill Trent, Science Sleuth, a public-domain hero from the 1940s. Write, draw, celebrate awesome female characters.
Plus it’s called “Science Sleuth.”
Writers and artists invited to submit: Superdames.org/contest
(Only 2 weeks left! Deadline is Aug. 1, 2014!)

Write the next #JillTrent Science Sleuth comic.

superdames:

I heard you couldn’t go to San Diego. I’m sad too. Here’s something to do instead.

We’re making a comic starring Jill Trent, Science Sleuth, a public-domain hero from the 1940s. Write, draw, celebrate awesome female characters.

Plus it’s called “Science Sleuth.”

Writers and artists invited to submit: Superdames.org/contest

(Only 2 weeks left! Deadline is Aug. 1, 2014!)

Write the next #JillTrent Science Sleuth comic.

superdames:

Women in Science: A Short Personal Note on Why Jill Trent, Science Sleuth, Is Important to Me
I don’t usually do this, but Jill Trent, Science Sleuth, has become such a big part of my life since I launched this project and she won the online poll that, well, here goes.
My wife is a female neuroscientist. Many of our closest friends are women who are also scientists. This is a subject that is deeply personal for me.
There is a gigantic gender gap in the sciences, especially at the post-doc level. To cite just a few facts:
In the U.S. and Europe, about 50% of doctoral graduates in science and engineering are women — but only 21% of full professors in science and 5% of full professors in engineering are women.
Female scientists on average earn 82% of what male scientists make in the U.S. — and even less in Europe.
Studies have confirmed the existence of unconscious institutional gender bias in science: Science faculty of both genders at research universities rated the application materials of a male student more highly than a female student — when there was no difference in the content of the material except the student’s name.
Sources: (1); (2); (3).
There are very complex social and political reasons for all this but you don’t have to spend more than five minutes talking to a female scientist to understand that institutional sexism, however unconscious or unintentional, is still alive and kicking in the 21st century.
The journal Nature's special issue on the gender gap in science specifically states the lack of female role models in science as one major reason why this problem persists.
So yeah, the comic book hero Jill Trent, Science Sleuth, is a badass successful scientist and inventor who solves crimes. On the one hand, she’s just a silly comic book character who exists for light entertainment. But on the other hand, we desperately need characters like her to push forward our imaginations and our dreams for what we and our daughters can accomplish and be and achieve in the real world.
And this issue could not be more real for me.
Representation most definitely matters.

More #women in #science. We’re losing half of our potential.

superdames:

Women in Science: A Short Personal Note on Why Jill Trent, Science Sleuth, Is Important to Me

I don’t usually do this, but Jill Trent, Science Sleuth, has become such a big part of my life since I launched this project and she won the online poll that, well, here goes.

My wife is a female neuroscientist. Many of our closest friends are women who are also scientists. This is a subject that is deeply personal for me.

There is a gigantic gender gap in the sciences, especially at the post-doc level. To cite just a few facts:

  • In the U.S. and Europe, about 50% of doctoral graduates in science and engineering are women — but only 21% of full professors in science and 5% of full professors in engineering are women.
  • Female scientists on average earn 82% of what male scientists make in the U.S. — and even less in Europe.
  • Studies have confirmed the existence of unconscious institutional gender bias in science: Science faculty of both genders at research universities rated the application materials of a male student more highly than a female student — when there was no difference in the content of the material except the student’s name.

Sources: (1); (2); (3).

There are very complex social and political reasons for all this but you don’t have to spend more than five minutes talking to a female scientist to understand that institutional sexism, however unconscious or unintentional, is still alive and kicking in the 21st century.

The journal Nature's special issue on the gender gap in science specifically states the lack of female role models in science as one major reason why this problem persists.

So yeah, the comic book hero Jill Trent, Science Sleuth, is a badass successful scientist and inventor who solves crimes. On the one hand, she’s just a silly comic book character who exists for light entertainment. But on the other hand, we desperately need characters like her to push forward our imaginations and our dreams for what we and our daughters can accomplish and be and achieve in the real world.

And this issue could not be more real for me.

Representation most definitely matters.

More #women in #science. We’re losing half of our potential.

humansofnewyork:

"Are you lonely?""It’s been a lifetime of loneliness. I decided early on that I better get used to it. I go to movies by myself. If the movie theater is completely empty, I’m even happier. I learned early on that if I wanted to go to restaurants, I better learn to go by myself. One benefit to being big is that people don’t bother you. I’m shocked that you came up to me. Nobody’s ever done that. When I started to go to therapy, it took me several sessions before I even spoke a word. I’d just sit there and cry. And honestly, you caught me on a tough day. I was sitting here feeling really bad about myself. Because I went to the doctor today, and I was sure that I’d lost weight. But I’d gained some."

humansofnewyork:

"Are you lonely?"
"It’s been a lifetime of loneliness. I decided early on that I better get used to it. I go to movies by myself. If the movie theater is completely empty, I’m even happier. I learned early on that if I wanted to go to restaurants, I better learn to go by myself. One benefit to being big is that people don’t bother you. I’m shocked that you came up to me. Nobody’s ever done that. When I started to go to therapy, it took me several sessions before I even spoke a word. I’d just sit there and cry. And honestly, you caught me on a tough day. I was sitting here feeling really bad about myself. Because I went to the doctor today, and I was sure that I’d lost weight. But I’d gained some."

superdames:

Fun fact: Rosie the Riveter majored in jiu-jitsu in college. ;-)
alternateworldcomics:

Rosie the Riveter as seen in War Victory Adventures from Harvey Comics.


#RosieTheRiveter

superdames:

Fun fact: Rosie the Riveter majored in jiu-jitsu in college. ;-)

alternateworldcomics:

Rosie the Riveter as seen in War Victory Adventures from Harvey Comics.

#RosieTheRiveter