"We’ve all selected the wrong partners, all gotten hurt, and hopefully all moved on wiser for the experience. But there are those who, even in the face of constant disappointment, continue to believe that the intensity of their desire will be rewarded by an eventual jackpot of affection. And if that’s the slot machine you’re playing, friend, you’d better leave the casino ‘cause that one don’t pay out"

— Paul Dini

#quote Work by Danger Dust in chalk

#quote Work by Danger Dust in chalk

Tags: quotes

thewritingcafe:

WHAT IS NANOWRIMO?
NaNoWriMo stands for National Novel Writing Month. It begins on November 1st of every year and goes until 11:59 on November 30th. During this time, participants must write a novel that is at least 50,000 words.
If you win NaNoWriMo, you get some perks that are listed on the website each year. Examples include discounts on writing software, free downloads, and some free physical copies of your self published book.
There is also a related event called Camp NaNoWriMo. This is the same as NaNoWriMo, but with a few differences:
Camp NaNoWriMo takes place in April and July.
On the Camp NaNoWriMo website, you can be in “cabins" with other writers where you can chat and encourage each other to write.
You can set your own word count goal for Camp NaNoWriMo.
FAQ ABOUT NANOWRIMO
Do I have to write a novel? Can I write an anthology of short stories?

While the original premise was to write a novel, you are free to write an anthology or short stories (or something similar) if you wish.

Does it have to be original fiction? Can I write fan fiction?

Again, the original premise was to write original fiction, but you can write fan fiction if you want.

Am I allowed to plan my story before November?

Yes! Writers are encouraged to prepare prior to NaNoWriMo.

Am I allowed to start writing my story before NaNoWriMo as long as I write an additional 50k words during November?

You’re supposed to start with a new story, but there’s no one to stop you from continuing an old story or even rewriting one.

Does my novel have to be 50,000 words, or can I go over?

You can definitely go over the word count.

Make sure to check the nanowrimo website for more FAQs.
PLANNING AND PREPARATION 
If you’re prone to writer’s block, I highly recommend that you plan before you write:
My Outlining and Planning Guide
Name Generators for People, Places, and Things 
Naming Characters 
Titles 
World Building 
Prepping For NaNoWriMo: The Outlining Stage
Otherwise, prepare mentally and physically for the challenge of writing a novel in a month. Plan out when you will write each day and for how long. Remember, you need at least 1667 words per day to reach the goal by the end of the month. Find a nice spot to write, have all your notes in order, and back up all your files. Here are some more tips and resources:
My Preparation Advice
Kris Noel’s Preparation Advice
Create Your Own Writer’s Retreat
Book Geek Confessions’ Prep Advice
WRITING
One thing you need to avoid during NaNoWriMo is editing. If you edit while you’re trying to write, your writing will be slowed and you’ll fall behind. Just keep writing.
Getting Started
Motivation 
Writing the Beginning 
Writing the Middle 
Writing the End
The Elephant Technique (for when you’re stuck with naming or describing something)
Finishing Your Story
Inspiration
Writing Playlists and Music
Writer’s Block
Writing Software and Websites
OTHER NANOWRIMO TIPS
10 NaNoWriMo Tips
20 Things You Should Know About NaNo
NaNo Tips
NaNoWriMo is Coming
Writer’s Digest NaNoWriMo Tips
Checklist for Nano
Lots of NaNo Tips
Word Count Widgets If You Don’t Like the NaNo Ones
AFTER NANO ENDS
So NaNoWriMo is over (or you’ve finished your novel) and now you have a rough draft of your manuscript. Here are some tips:
Do not immediately send it to an agent or publisher. Tons of people start sending out their manuscripts right after NaNoWriMo and it’s a huge mistake because they’re not sending polished, ready-to-be-published manuscripts. They’re sending rough drafts they wrote quickly.
Leave it alone before you start editing. Walk away from your manuscript and work on something else or take a break from writing. This break could be a few days, a few weeks, or even a few months. It depends on you. Then start editing once you’re fresh again.
For more on editing and publishing, see my How to Write and Publish a Novel page.

November is National Novel Writing Month. 50K words in 31 days. Get to it. #NaNoWriMo

thewritingcafe:

WHAT IS NANOWRIMO?

NaNoWriMo stands for National Novel Writing Month. It begins on November 1st of every year and goes until 11:59 on November 30th. During this time, participants must write a novel that is at least 50,000 words.

If you win NaNoWriMo, you get some perks that are listed on the website each year. Examples include discounts on writing software, free downloads, and some free physical copies of your self published book.

There is also a related event called Camp NaNoWriMo. This is the same as NaNoWriMo, but with a few differences:

  • Camp NaNoWriMo takes place in April and July.
  • On the Camp NaNoWriMo website, you can be in “cabins" with other writers where you can chat and encourage each other to write.
  • You can set your own word count goal for Camp NaNoWriMo.

FAQ ABOUT NANOWRIMO

Do I have to write a novel? Can I write an anthology of short stories?

While the original premise was to write a novel, you are free to write an anthology or short stories (or something similar) if you wish.

Does it have to be original fiction? Can I write fan fiction?

Again, the original premise was to write original fiction, but you can write fan fiction if you want.

Am I allowed to plan my story before November?

Yes! Writers are encouraged to prepare prior to NaNoWriMo.

Am I allowed to start writing my story before NaNoWriMo as long as I write an additional 50k words during November?

You’re supposed to start with a new story, but there’s no one to stop you from continuing an old story or even rewriting one.

Does my novel have to be 50,000 words, or can I go over?

You can definitely go over the word count.

Make sure to check the nanowrimo website for more FAQs.

PLANNING AND PREPARATION 

If you’re prone to writer’s block, I highly recommend that you plan before you write:

Otherwise, prepare mentally and physically for the challenge of writing a novel in a month. Plan out when you will write each day and for how long. Remember, you need at least 1667 words per day to reach the goal by the end of the month. Find a nice spot to write, have all your notes in order, and back up all your files. Here are some more tips and resources:

WRITING

One thing you need to avoid during NaNoWriMo is editing. If you edit while you’re trying to write, your writing will be slowed and you’ll fall behind. Just keep writing.

OTHER NANOWRIMO TIPS

AFTER NANO ENDS

So NaNoWriMo is over (or you’ve finished your novel) and now you have a rough draft of your manuscript. Here are some tips:

  • Do not immediately send it to an agent or publisher. Tons of people start sending out their manuscripts right after NaNoWriMo and it’s a huge mistake because they’re not sending polished, ready-to-be-published manuscripts. They’re sending rough drafts they wrote quickly.
  • Leave it alone before you start editing. Walk away from your manuscript and work on something else or take a break from writing. This break could be a few days, a few weeks, or even a few months. It depends on you. Then start editing once you’re fresh again.

For more on editing and publishing, see my How to Write and Publish a Novel page.

November is National Novel Writing Month. 50K words in 31 days. Get to it. #NaNoWriMo

"Don’t fear failure so much that you refuse to try new things. The saddest summary of a life contains three descriptions: could have, might have, and should have."

— Unknown (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

#failure #quote

(via characterandwritinghelp)

Anonymous said: One of my characters is a extremely powerful wizard in fact he is by far the most powerful wizard in the book, so my question is this how do i portray him as being very powerful yet not too powerful

clevergirlhelps:

  • He can wield a lot of power, but he might not have the skill to harness it. He tries to light a campfire and creates a towering inferno of death. He tries to brush a butterfly off his hand but ends up disintegrating it with a blast of wind. He tries to unravel someone’s socks and ends up unraveling their skin. That kind of thing.
  • He can have a lot of limiting personality traits. He may be strong, but not wise or smart enough to know when he should use his strength. He might be bad at knowing how good people are, and serves the wrong group for awhile. He could be impulsive, unimaginative, immature, or a number of other negative traits that his enemies could exploit. 
  • There’s always a bigger fish. It might not be a bad thing to introduce entities that could toss him into the next dimension. They don’t have to play a huge part in the story, like the antagonist. They just need to be there.
  • There could be all sorts of nasty side effects to using lots of magic, as he does.

Hints for #fantasy #writers.

teachingliteracy:

yasboogie:
7-Year-Old Zora Ball Is the World’s Youngest Game Programmer
The youngest person to create a full version of a mobile application video game. A first grader at Philadelphia’s Harambee Institute of Science and Technology Charter School, she’s already more accomplished than everyone you know.
Ball built the app in the Bootstrap programming language, and unveiled her game at FATE’s “Bootstrap Expo” at the University of Pennsylvania.
Apparently some grumpy olds were suspicious that her older brother was really the mastermind behind the program, but Zora showed them. When asked to reconfigure the app on the spot, Ball showed naysayers what was up when she executed the request perfectly.
“We expect great things from Zora, as her older brother, Trace Ball, is a past STEM Scholar of the Year,” said Harambee Science Teacher Tariq Al-Nasir. No pressure, baby geniuses, but there’s an entire world for you to save. Please hurry.
[ht @Jezebel via @PhillyTrib]


7 year old software developer.

teachingliteracy:

yasboogie:

7-Year-Old Zora Ball Is the World’s Youngest Game Programmer

The youngest person to create a full version of a mobile application video game. A first grader at Philadelphia’s Harambee Institute of Science and Technology Charter School, she’s already more accomplished than everyone you know.

Ball built the app in the Bootstrap programming language, and unveiled her game at FATE’s “Bootstrap Expo” at the University of Pennsylvania.

Apparently some grumpy olds were suspicious that her older brother was really the mastermind behind the program, but Zora showed them. When asked to reconfigure the app on the spot, Ball showed naysayers what was up when she executed the request perfectly.

“We expect great things from Zora, as her older brother, Trace Ball, is a past STEM Scholar of the Year,” said Harambee Science Teacher Tariq Al-Nasir. No pressure, baby geniuses, but there’s an entire world for you to save. Please hurry.

[ht @Jezebel via @PhillyTrib]

7 year old software developer.

(via kyuenkyu)

explore-blog:


The mouse, with its ability to click on specific parts of a document, was the device that made hypertext possible. Without hypertext, there would be no links, and without links, no web. 

The first computer mouse, held by its inventor, Douglas Engelbart, in 1963 – one of the 100 ideas that changed the web. 


The first computer mouse.

explore-blog:

The mouse, with its ability to click on specific parts of a document, was the device that made hypertext possible. Without hypertext, there would be no links, and without links, no web. 

The first computer mouse, held by its inventor, Douglas Engelbart, in 1963 – one of the 100 ideas that changed the web

The first computer mouse.

(via nrdvsgk)

"Years ago my mother used to say to me, she’d say, “In this world, Elwood, you must be” - she always called me Elwood - “In this world, Elwood, you must be oh so smart or oh so pleasant.” Well, for years I was smart. I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

— Elwood P. Dowd, “Harvey” (1950)

sno4wy:

How To Draw Better In 2 Minutes

#draw better in 2 minutes.

(via artist-refs)

Do the thing.

Do the thing.

(Source: moosekleenex)

brianmichaelbendis:

Love & Rockets #24 Cover - Art by Jaime Hernandez


#LoveAndRockets

brianmichaelbendis:

Love & Rockets #24 Cover - Art by Jaime Hernandez

#LoveAndRockets

(Source: theimaginauts, via comicblah)

atelier-sento:

Spera: Making of a Comic Page

Watch us as we work on a comic page, from the first sketch to the color. Everything is made on paper using pencils, drawing gum and watercolor.
Feel free to ask if you have any question about the process.

Spera: Ascension of the Starless
Chapter 2
Scenario: Josh Tierney
Art: Atelier Sentô

The book is coming this fall. We can’t wait for it!
http://spera-comic.com

The music in the video is from Spera II Original Soundtrack by Giannis Milonogiannis.
Download the album for free right here.

theimportantfile:

I’ve been wanting to bring some fighting and weapon swinging into my daily pose drawing, so today I trawled my links and puttered around deviantArt to find some reference.  

SenshiStock - Fights and Fighting Pose Reference — exactly what it says on the tin, plus SenshiStock is a deviantArt stock photo institution ifn ur askin me
kristinkk — professional-looking photographs, plus several interesting models; it’s not every day I get to see a ton of cool photos of female bodybuilders
syccas-stock - Warriors - also exactly what it says on the tin.  well-organized, good quality.
Random-Acts-Stock - Art poses stock - sword fighting stuff, as well as a ton of other stuff in the rest of their gallery

images used are credited in that ^^ order

#art #references

(via anatomicalart)

anatomicalart:

Let me link Yall’ to this holy grail.
I present to you Character Design Reference
on [Pintrest] || [Tumblr] || [Twitter] || [Facebook] || [YouTube]

I couldn’t even include all of the reference boards this blog contains on this photoset. That’s right! There’s EVEN MORE! There are pages and pages of them! It is an inspiration treasure trove!
Bookmark this link!
Fill your life with inspiration!

#art #references

deimos-remus:

100 Illustrators that all Illustrators should know: #22

Andrew Loomis (1892-1959)

Country: United States

Famous for: Advertisement art, Instructional books

Influenced: Alex Ross, Steve Rude, Gil Elvgren, Art Instruction

Influenced by: George Bridgman, Howard Pyle, Charles Dana Gibson, N.C Wyeth, J.C Leyendecker, 

Andrew Loomis was an American illustrator that worked on tons of advertisements, in large formats such as billboards, as well as smaller formats such as magazine ads, packaging design and displays. Though he was one of the premier illustrators of his day, Loomis had enormous success with a series of instructional books detailing the illustrator’s process. Taught by George Bridgman, who was famous for his instructional anatomy books, Loomis’ books include: Figure Drawing for All its Worth, Creative Illustration, Drawing the Head and Hands, Successful Drawing, Fun with a Pencil, and Eye of the Painter. These books were reprinted hundreds of times, and are among the most commonly cited resources by illustrators for those wanting to pursue any kind of art-related career. These books cover everything from Perspective, Anatomy, Color, Composition, Value, Design and everything in-between, all taught with a quaint sense of humor and nice, light-hearted demeanor.  

#Loomis is one of my heroes.